8 Things You Didn’t Know About ‘Black-ish’

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The ABC sitcom Black-ish is still a relatively new show with only two seasons under its belt, but it’s already broken down many barriers and become one of the most talked about shows on the air right now as it tackles important issues like racism, diversity and even police brutality. The series tells the story of The Johnson’s, a middle class African American family living in a classy neighborhood starring veteran actors like Anthony Anderson and Tracee Ellis Ross. Black-ish has received widespread critical acclaim, receiving many nominations and awards including two Emmy nominations in the category of Outstanding Comedy Series. The series is about to begin its third season so we’ve decided to take a look at 8 things you might not have known about the popular series, Black-ish!

8. The Show is Somewhat Autobiographical

The show isn’t necessarily a biography, but show creator Kenya Barris has stated that he drew comparisons from his own life, as well as lead actor Anthony Anderson, who is also an executive producer on the show, when he created the Johnson family. “Kenya and I sat down two years ago and conceived the show. The show in its original form was about both our families. We’re products of the inner city — Kenya from Inglewood and me from Compton — and both of us are first-generation successful. All of our children are in private schools, and we’re the only blacks living in our respective neighborhoods. When we met for the first time, we met to talk about business, but we ended up talking about each other and found out that we had more in common than not,” said Anderson. For example, matriarch Rainbow Johnson is a bi-racial anesthesiologist while Barris’s own wife, who is also named Rainbow, is an anesthesiologist with a white father and black mother. Unlike Anthony, Tracee has stated that she’s actually nothing like her character, Bow. In real life, Tracee was raised by a famous mother, Diane Ross and is often found wearing heels, accessories and makeup while Bow is much more low key and has a more average, day-to-day comfortable attire.

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7. Episodes Come from Real Life Experiences

Barris has also stated that many of the ideas for episodes come from his own real life experiences with his kids, in particular the conversations he has with them. One episode that stands out in many peoples minds is the episode titled “Hope” from the second season when the family discusses police brutality. Jack, the youngest son, asks his father “Why are all these people so mad?” when he sees the news footage. In an interview with the Washington Post, Barris talks about using his son’s questions as a guideline of how to tackle this issue on the show. “I didn’t want to change or skew [my son’s] point of view because he has to grow up in this world. I spoke to a lot of people that I know, other parents…and friends and that was an issue that – whether it had been about police brutality or whatever – a lot of parents are having to go through right now.” Similar to Barris, Anthony Anderson has contributed a lot of his own real life experiences to the show. For example in the pilot episode when Dre throws his son a bro mitzvah, this is something that Anthony Anderson did for his son in real life. In an interview with Anderson, he said, “My son came to me one day and told me that he didn’t feel black and wanted to have a bar mitzvah, so I met him halfway and threw him a ‘bro mitzvah,’ and you see that in the pilot.”

ABC

ABC

Thanks to: Fame10 » TV

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